Miraculous Nourishment in the Desert

Sermon by Rev. Kelly Jane Caesar

March 22, 2020

Scripture: John 9:1-12

Sermon Part 1: Spit 

As a pandemic sweeps across the globe, we certainly need some healing. 

The lectionary Gospel story this week is one of many Jesus healing stories. 

The source of healing however, is rather gross: 

Spit. Mud and Saliva.  

In the ancient Greco-Roman period spit and clay were actually popular in healing stories, 

But in our modern world we know that spit carries germs and illness. 

Thus we cover our mouths when we cough and may wear a mask if sick. 

Our human spit can carry germs that can make others sick.  

Yet, Jesus uses his spit to bring healing to the man born blind. 

Jesus is God incarnate, the Divine One among us – 

So in an odd way we could consider the spit of Jesus to be Divine Water.  

While spit is usually gross, Jesus is able to use it for good.  

God often takes what is gross or less valuable and uses it for good. 

God called a little shepherd boy to be King of Israel. 

God took the littlest brother Joseph, the one whose brothers all despised him, 

And used him to save the whole family.  

Jesus included prostitutes and tax collectors in his ministry. 

God often takes people or situations that look gross and transforms them into something great 

As we wander through this desert time, God will nourish us and bring healing – pulling goodness out of grossness.

As we seek healing during this time – 

Healing from coronavirus, healing from fear, healing from panic –  

We would do well to look at how God brings healing –  

Healing may come in unexpected and unconventional ways.  

Maybe we find healing in connecting with loved ones in more intentional ways, 

Even if those ways are virtual or on the phone. 

Maybe we find healing in new coping strategies,  

now that many of our “go-tos” are not available. 

Maybe we find healing in a new perspective or view of our lives. 

Let’s hear now what happens to the man born blind when he is no longer blind and certainly has a new perspective on his life after an unexpected healing.  

ScriptureJohn 9:13-34 

Sermon Part 2: How to Spit 

The Pharisees seem to have missed the miracle of the man receiving sight.  

They are so preoccupied by their fear, that they miss the bigger picture of healing. 

The Pharisees discount Jesus because he broke a holy rule to not work on the sabbath, 

And in doing so they seem to miss the point: 

Jesus has done a miraculous healing. 

When the blind man points out the obvious – uh, I can see, this guy Jesus must be from God – 

Well the Pharisees discount the man born blind too – 

They keep to their view that he is a sinner and kick him out. 

The Pharisees are so afraid that Jesus is going to take away their power or change their lives, 

That they latch on to small things and miss the big miracle. 

The Pharisees are not the only ones who act foolishly in fear. 

In fear people are hoarding toilet paper and Lysol wipes. 

In fear people are fighting in grocery stores, forcing police to stay on the scene. 

In fear people are pointing fingers and blaming nations and leaders  

and anyone not responding as they are.  

Fear keeps people looking selfishly, narrowing on their own interest 

And missing the bigger picture. 

During the desert time of this Coronavirus pandemic,  

It is easy to let fear run the race, 

Yet Jesus is nourishing us by asking us to look wider than fear and see the big picture.  

[Add Water to Vase] 

In this desert time I find myself forced to think big picture about essentials. 

What do I really need? Do I really need to take that trip out? 

Is it worth risking my life? Is it worth risking the life of someone I love? 

With so many activities wiped off the table,  

I need to be far more intentional about what I do and who I talk to. 

No one is expecting to see me in yoga on Monday morning – 

So if yoga is important to me, I got to prioritize it. 

This desert time is in fact the perfect time to step back and look at our lives. 

What is important? What is essential? 

Instead of getting caught in fear and nit-picking, 

We have an opportunity to reconsider our priorities.  

More than an opportunity, we are forced into making new decisions about what is important to us. 

I hope each of us will keep our focus wide and not get stuck in the fearful tunnel vision.  

While the Pharisees were stuck in fear, the man born blind was able to see the big picture.  

Let’s listen now to the conclusion of this miracle where the Jesus concludes his response to the question of “who sinned?” 

ScriptureJohn 9:35-41 

Sermon Part 3Why Spit 

In times of great suffering humans tends to look for where to place blame. 

Scapegoats are common and have detrimental impacts on minorities.  

Often we humans wonder, why are bad things happening?  

Who sinned that this would happen? Who is to blame for the suffering? 

At the very beginning of our scripture today, 

Jesus responds by proclaiming that the man born blind was not a result of sin, 

But that God’s glory may be revealed. 

It is not about “who sinned”, not about who to blame, 

But about what God is doing.

In this miracle story, Jesus refocuses the question. 

He redirects our focus: 

Away from the blame game  

And towards God’s glory. 

Instead of pointing blame, 

Jesus points to God’s goodness.  

In this desert time we can be tempted to get caught up looking at all the sand, 

And miss the nourishing water God is providing. 

[Add Water to Vase] 

May our eyes be open to God’s work around us; 

For God has a habit of doing good even when the world is spinning in chaos.  

May we look for God’s blessings in unexpected places; 

For God has a habit of using gross or undervalued people or situations for good.  

May our vision not be fearfully narrow, but hopefully wide; 

For God has a habit of working big miracles.  

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